Europe

Trump hits back at G7

Trump Wants To Free America From “Fool Trade” And Flip The Tables On The EU

The Cold War-era quid pro quo of the US providing costly security assistance to its NATO allies in order to enable them to concentrate more fully on building their utopian welfare states is no longer relevant because of the changing nature of geopolitics and the rise of asymmetrical threats, though Clinton, Bush, and Obama perpetuated this state of affairs because it advanced the Liberal-Globalist model that all three of them were pursuing at the expense of average Americans.

Geopolitcs of the Mediteranean Sea

Geopolitics Of The Mediterranean Sea Area In Global Security During And After The Cold War (1949-1989)

TheMediterranean Sea is one of the key strategic points of interest for the NATO from the creation of this military organization in 1949 during the Cold War in order to challenge the real or potential threats for its security. Within a global concept of the NATO security system, Turkey, Greece and Italy compose a sub-system of countries which belong to its “Southern Wing”.

Libya

Libya According To The UN And The Harsh Reality

Contrary to appearances, Libya’s problem is not so much the rivalry between its leaders as the absence of pacification between tribes and the exclusion of Kadhafists. The solution can only be negotiated between the four leaders united in Paris, but only within and around the House of Representatives of Tobruk, whose authority now covers 80 % of the territory.

The Slavo-Macedonians As A Tool For The Creation Of Tito’s Greater Yugoslavia

The Yugoslav post-1945 policy of the recognition of Slavo-Macedonians as a separate ethnolinguistic entity was extremely important for the creation of the separate political unit of Macedonia within the Yugoslav federation. After 1945 Yugoslav authorities claimed that the Macedonian diaspora living outside of Yugoslavia has to be incorporated into the “motherland” – a Yugoslav Macedonia.

Serbs and Croats

The Idea Of The Yugoslav Unification (III)

The “Idea of Union” in a single national state had deep roots in the historical development of political ideas among the South Slavs. This idea had several stages of development and the features of expression but, basically, the supporters of the “Idea of Union” primarily understood the Serbo-Croatian cultural, national and political cooperation, reciprocity, solidarity and finally unification as a “backbone” of any kind of a South Slavic state’s organization.